10
Jan

The Strip in 2013: Recovery and Retrenchment in Vegas Seven

In this week’s Green Felt Journal, I take a look at what lies ahead for Las Vegas in 2013. Seem like the right time:

The New Year has its restorative elements—the celebrations, the resolutions, the fresh hopes. But, against the background of the Great Recession, it’s also another occasion to fret about what lies ahead for Las Vegas casinos.

via

The Strip in 2013: Recovery and Retrenchment | Vegas Seven

Although at first it might seem like there’s not a lot planned, there’s going to be considerable investment and construction on the Strip and Downtown. I look forward to seeing how things shape up.

20
Dec

Nightlifeless in Vegas Seven

Vegas Seven’s nightclub issue is out today! And what better topic for the Green Felt Journal than…casinos without nightclubs:

If you’ve been on the Strip in the past five years, you know that nightclubs are front-and-center at most big resorts. Which begs the question: What’s a Vegas casino look like today when you subtract the nightclubs?
via Nightlifeless | Vegas Seven

When I found out that this was the nightlife issue, I had a dilemma: I don’t really have much to say about nightclubs, but I couldn’t write about something totally unconnected. So I figured this was a fun way to look at the impact of nightclubs on casinos.

I’m hoping for a fun segment on the next Vegas Gang: vibe dining vs. Seafood Shack. I’d really like to have that discussion, because to me you’ve got two extremes: upscale/pretentious vs. homey/tacky. I know which I feel is preferably, but I’d like to hear what the other guys think.

6
Dec

The Year of Hope and Holding Steady in Vegas Seven

Today’s Green Felt Journal in Vegas Seven is a look back at 2012:

The people who run Las Vegas casinos were expecting a lot in 2012: a return to prosperity on the Strip, a revival downtown and a federal framework for online poker. They didn’t get everything they wanted, but at the end of the year, they’re still in the game, which might be a victory in and of itself.

via The Year of Hope and Holding Steady | Vegas Seven.

A little early, maybe, to start looking back, but because of the end-of-year issue, this is the final Green Felt Journal for 2012. It’s been a great year to write about Las Vegas.

29
Nov

Our Rodeo Soul, Vegas Seven cover story

This week, I’ve been honored with another cover story in Vegas Seven magazine. Here, I step a little bit away from the gambling beat and investigate the past and potential future of National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas:

The Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, which comes to the Thomas & Mack Center Dec. 6-15, is like a pair of cowboy boots that have been sitting in the closet for too many months. At first, they pinch a little, but after a while, they seem to flex to fit your feet, and you notice that you kind of like the swagger they lend you.

via Our Rodeo Soul | Vegas Seven.

Very fun piece to write, not the least because I didn’t have to crunch one set of gaming numbers for it. Which is fun in its own way for me, but it’s always nice to have a change of scenery. Great photos from UNLV Special Collections and the Las Vegas News Bureau add quite a bit to the narrative.

26
Nov

The New Road Starts Here in Vegas Seven

Last week’s Green Felt Journal in Vegas Seven took a look at how the repurposing of a nondescript piece of commercial real estate just west of the Strip is full of significance:

The 20,000-square-foot converted warehouse’s history is just as interesting as its future. Before the new tenants started moving in, the building was the design center for the Cosmopolitan. The long, high-ceilinged expanse that is being reconfigured to host a few dozen work stations used to host mock-ups of the Strip’s last mega-resort’s rooms: The very space where customer-service representatives will soon walk online poker players through registration was filled with designers poring over Wraparound Terrace Suites and City Rooms.

via The New Road Starts Here | Vegas Seven.

Interesting to see the transition happening in front of us.

8
Nov

Inside the Trading Room in Vegas Seven

In addition to the cover feature, I’ve got a Green Felt Journal in this week’s Vegas Seven that takes us behind the scenes, into William Hill’s sports betting war room:

It’s 8:30 on a Sunday morning in October, but for the crew of bookmakers at William Hill headquarters on Grier Drive, just south of McCarran, the workday is well under way. Their business is overseeing the bets flowing in from sportsbooks from Whiskey Pete’s in Primm to Stockmen’s Casino in Elko, betting kiosks at PT’s Pubs and Buffalo Wild Wings, and phones and mobile devices. And judging from the mood, business is good.

via Inside the Trading Room | Vegas Seven.

Note: I was in the war room about three weeks ago, so this isn’t what went down last weekend, when the books had their worst day ever.

I’ve got to say I had a lot of fun writing this one. And the funny thing is that my time in surveillance still affects the way I think. When I saw that the story art was a photo of the war room, I felt this immediate panic–“Oh no! They let people see inside the room!” When I worked in CCTV it was taboo to let any non-CCTV person into the room at all, with a few exceptions. It’s an almost religious prohibition. But I guess that sports books are, indeed different. Still, I couldn’t help but think of “He’ll see the big board!” from Dr. Strangelove.

My ramblings aside, I hope you enjoy this little insight into what bookmakers do on Sunday morning.

8
Nov

The Columbus of Highway 91 in Vegas Seven

This week, I’m privileged to have a cover story in Vegas Seven. It’s about the mostly-unsung hotelier who, I think, is the real discoverer of the Las Vegas Strip, Thomas Hull:

The natural advantages of Las Vegas, Fisher said, would make it “the metropolis of Nevada,” but only if properly pushed: “If a good hotel man could be taken to Las Vegas and introduced to the wonderful winter weather, I believe that he could be interested in building a resort hotel that would put the little desert town on the map.”

More than 20 years would pass before that man—Thomas Hull—would arrive and change the place forever. This is his story.

via The Columbus of Highway 91 | Vegas Seven.

A few thoughts: first, I’ve been researching and writing about the development of the Strip for about 15 years now, but in working on this feature I learned a few new things about Hull, so I think that even if you already know his story, you’ll find this an entertaining read.

Second, there are still plenty of people who don’t know anything about Hull, and think of Bugsy Siegel as the founder of the Strip, even though Hull opened his casino 5.5 years before the Flamingo, and the basic idea of a fancy Vegas hotel had been kicking around since 1918.

I think Columbus is a great analogy for Hull (not mine–I write the stories, not the headlines). Others had been on Highway 91 before, but Hull’s the one who built the resort that really put it on the map.

I really got inspired to write this feature by Tony Hsieh and the Downtown Project. I saw some parallels: California entrepreneur courted to rescue Downtown Las Vegas who brings something new to town. Like Hull, I think that Hsieh may change the city in ways that aren’t apparent right now. They even have the same initials. As the Downtown Project plays out, I’m looking forward to learning and writing more about it. I’m very lucky to be in a city where I’ve got so much history unfolding around me.

The last thing I’d like to share is that it’s always a thrill to get a cover story, particularly when the cover art is as good as it is for this issue. It really means a great deal to me knowing that the editorial staff has enough faith in my writing to trust me with the cover feature. And if you like the story, a good deal of the credit goes to my editor Greg Blake Miller, who helped me revise, rework, and refine the story.  He’s a great writer who’s also a great editor, and his help in getting this story into its final state was invaluable.

29
Oct

Colbert Arrest Highlights Hypocrisy of Prohibition in Vegas Seven

Last week, Mike Colbert’s arrest was big news. I commented about it pretty extensively in a few places, but I didn’t have time until yesterday to pull my thoughts together and put them down in one place. The result is a Vegas Seven blog post:

The arrest last week of 25 people—including Cantor Gaming’s sports book manager Mike Colbert—in a national sports betting bust triggered a firestorm of commentary, most of it focused on the calamitous effect Colbert’s arrest would have on a range of issues, from Cantor’s future in Nevada to the pending efforts to legalize sports betting in New Jersey (and, ultimately, other states). Certainly, the arrest of a major figure in a major Nevada sports betting company on a gaming-related charge is a black eye for the industry, but I don’t believe it’s the game-changer that others seem to think it is. Here’s why.

via Colbert Arrest Highlights Hypocrisy of Prohibition | Vegas Seven.

I want to make it clear that I’m not trying to handicap Colbert’s chances at trial or guess what’s going to happen specifically to Cantor, because 1) I’m not a lawyer and 2) there’s too much information that’s not known yet. Instead, I’m talking about the bigger social and political impact that the arrests might have.

There are illegal sports betting arrests happening all the time, which makes it clear that a lot of people are betting illegally. With so many other forms of gambling legalized, there comes a time when you have to ask: couldn’t law enforcement resources be better utilized investigating other forms of crime?

25
Oct

With PBR, Rodeo’s Heart Will Go On in Vegas Seven

The rare Celine Dion headline title drop for a Vegas Seven piece this week. It’s about Professional Bull Riding:

We’re used to early December being rodeo time in Las Vegas; that’s when the National Finals Rodeo takes over the town. But NFR’s not-so-little cousin, Professional Bull Riders’ Built Ford Tough World Finals, shakes the ground at the Thomas & Mack Center through Oct. 28—and it’s become a local institution in its own right

via With PBR, Rodeo’s Heart Will Go On | Vegas Seven.

Having driven through everyone getting into the Built Ford Tough Finals yesterday on my way home, I can attest to PBR’s popularity. And it’s kind of fun calling the event by its official name, the Built Ford Tough Finals.

18
Oct

The Organization Man | Vegas Seven

This week, Vegas Seven published its Storytelling Issue. The theme is “I Fought the Law, ” and in the Latest Thought, I discuss who and what the real Moe Daltiz was…and wasn’t:

In the CBS version of Las Vegas in the 1960s, it’s pretty easy to know who the bad guy is: Michael Chiklis’ mobbed-up Vegas antihero struts around his casino wearing a black fedora, has federal witnesses bumped off, and tries to charm the new sheriff with free champagne. He’s smooth, cunning and completely in control.

In Las Vegas circa 2012, that bad guy’s actually considered a pretty good guy. We’ve rewritten our history to suit the cinematic notion of the mobster as an action hero, a four-color study in pure, brutal power. Most of the real connected guys who settled in Vegas though, were boringly, sometimes devastatingly good at running their businesses. And they left the black fedoras and bloodlust at home. Moe Dalitz was perhaps the most influential of them all.

via The Organization Man | Vegas Seven.

I started riffing about this a while back, and I’m still trying to capture the nuances   with Dalitz. Not quite the romantic criminal figure he’s often made out to be, but not exactly the thoroughly honest businessman he represented himself as.