How to Prepare for Emerging Gaming Today – Vegas Seven

In this week’s Green Felt Journal, I expand a little on my testimony in front of the Gaming Policy Committee: During a meeting convened by Governor Brian Sandoval earlier this month, the task before the Gaming Policy Committee was clear: Figure out how Nevada can adapt to emerging gaming—a sprawling, shifting area that, right now, comprises … Read more

How to Keep Las Vegas’ Forward Momentum Rolling – Vegas Seven

In my latest Green Felt Journal, I look at the importance of the new Southern Nevada Tourism Infrastructure Committee: Las Vegas may be breaking tourism records—May was the city’s busiest month ever, with more than 3.7 million visitors—but that doesn’t mean it’s time to get complacent. Governor Brian Sandoval must understand this, since he’s assembled a … Read more

How a Few Regulators Saved the Nevada Gaming Industry | Vegas Seven

In this week’s Green Felt Journal, I consider how strict regulation with room for discretion helped save Nevada gaming in the 1960s: Sawyer’s “hang tough” policy emerged at a crucial time: Bobby Kennedy’s Justice Department would ratchet up pressure on Nevada casinos starting in 1961, and without the good-faith efforts of Sawyer’s appointees to clean … Read more

Is Nevada Moving Away From Gambling? | Vegas Seven

In this week’s Green Felt Journal, I consider the 150-year history of Nevada and gambling, and wonder what the future will hold: The original match wasn’t exactly a marriage of convenience, but it wasn’t a forbidden romance, either. When Nevada joined the Union in 1864, it soberly criminalized the gambling that had been rampant—as it was … Read more

Cal-Neva Confidential

In the 1930s, North Shore Lake Tahoe’s Cal-Neva Lodge, owned by James McKay and William Graham, was notorious for reportedly hosting gangsters like Baby Face Nelson and Pretty Boy Floyd.

Learn more about the Cal-Neva, which was later owned by Frank Sinatra, in Roll the Bones: The History of Gambling

Go here to read an excerpt from the book, or learn where to buy your copy.

Bad Debts in Las Vegas

For years, Nevada casinos could not legally collect debts from gamblers they’d extended credit (or, in the industry parlance, given markers) to. That changed in 1983, when the state legislature amended the law to allow casinos to prosecute deadbeat marker-takers for writing bad checks.

That’s one of the interesting facts about the changing legal face of Nevada gambling you’ll learn  in Roll the Bones: The History of Gambling

Go here to read an excerpt from the book, or learn where to buy your copy.

Today in history–March 19, 1931

It’s one of the big ones: on March 19, 1931, Nevada governor Fred Balzar signed Assembly Bill 98 into law. That’s the measure that made it legal (once more) for Nevada gambling halls to offer commercial gambling (games line faro, craps, blackjack, and slot machines) to the public. With a stroke of the pen, Nevada’s gaming industry was born.

You can learn much more about the growth of gaming in Nevada in Roll the Bones: The History of Gambling

Go here to read an excerpt from the book, or learn where to buy your copy.

Nevada’s first governor on gambling

Nevada’s first governor, Henry Bladsel, wasn’t a fan of gambling. He called it “an intolerable and inexcusable vice” after taking office in 1864, and he convinced the legislature to strengthen penalties against gambling.

That didn’t stop Nevadans from gambling, and in 1869 the legislature passed a law legalizing gambling. Over Bladsel’s veto. The rest is quite literally history.

You can read the entire story of Nevada gambling in Roll the Bones: The History of Gambling

Go here to read an excerpt from the book, or learn where to buy your copy.