The Importance of People in Vegas Seven

In this column for Vegas Seven, I think a little about how not everything can be automated:

It’s hard to argue against the financial benefits that a robot bartender or check-in kiosk can have over a human employee. In many cases, automation can lead to a better customer experience. If you don’t believe me, tell me the last time you cashed a check with a teller in a bank? The development of direct deposit and ATMs has made lives much easier for a lot of us, but probably hasn’t helped launch many careers for bank tellers.

Read it all: The Importance of People in the Gaming Industry and Beyond

This is a big issue for the entire world, but is particularly crucial to Las Vegas.

 

AI Could Change More Than the Game(s) in Las Vegas

I first wrote this about a month ago. I was just thinking about the potential impact of AI and automation on Las Vegas. And now you can read it:

Since the invention of the slot machine over 100 years ago, automation has been a part of gambling, generally for the better. And yet recent developments in AI could substantially shift the Las Vegas resort industry, possibly (though not necessarily) for the better.

Read more: AI Could Change More Than the Game(s) in Las Vegas

I still don’t know whether more automation will be good or bad in the long term. There is just too much that I don’t know about the topic. I guess that why it’s the future.

What the Future of Tech and AI Looks Like for Las Vegas – Vegas Seven

In this week’s Green Felt Journal, I dwell (hopefully not excessively) on what less human interaction might mean for Las Vegas:

Hospitality is labor-intensive. It takes many hands to create the Las Vegas experience, from housekeeping to meal service. But perhaps that human touch won’t be needed at all someday. Two recent developments in autonomous technology and artificial intelligence will have profound meaning for Las Vegas hospitality.

Read more: What the Future of Tech and AI Looks Like for Las Vegas – Vegas Seven

I think that both developments–driverless vehicles and, more broadly, hospitality automation and AI–will be far more disruptive than most people think. Automating beverage service,which is already underway with the “standardization” of pours, will save money in the short term, but what are the long-term possibilities?